AskDefine | Define collect

Dictionary Definition

collect adj : payment due by the recipient on delivery; "a collect call"; "the letter came collect"; "a COD parcel" [syn: cod] n : a short prayer generally preceding the lesson in the Church of Rome or the Church of England adv : make a telephone call or mail a package so that the recipient pays; "call collect"; "send a package collect"

Verb

1 get or gather together; "I am accumulating evidence for the man's unfaithfulness to his wife"; "She is amassing a lot of data for her thesis"; "She rolled up a small fortune" [syn: roll up, accumulate, pile up, amass, compile, hoard]
2 call for and obtain payment of; "we collected over a million dollars in outstanding debts"; "he collected the rent" [syn: take in]
3 assemble or get together; "gather some stones"; "pull your thoughts together" [syn: gather, garner, pull together] [ant: spread]
4 get or bring together; "accumulate evidence" [syn: pull in]
5 gather or collect; "You can get the results on Monday"; "She picked up the children at the day care center"; "They pick up our trash twice a week" [syn: pick up, gather up, call for]

User Contributed Dictionary

English

Etymology

(noun) From French collecte (verb) From French collecter

Pronunciation

Noun

(sometimes capitalized)
  1. The prayer said before the reading of the epistle lesson, especially one found in a prayerbook, as with the Book of Common Prayer.
    He used the day's collect as the basis of his sermon.

Translations

prayer said before reading of the epistle lesson
  • Finnish: eturukous, kollehtarukous

Verb

  1. To gather together; amass items.
    Suzanne collected all the papers she had laid out.
  2. To get; particularly, get from someone.
    A bank collects a monthly payment on a client's new car loan.
    A mortgage company collects a monthly payment on a house.
  3. To accumulate similar items or items belonging to a particular theme, particularly for a hobby or recreation.
    John Henry collects stamps.

Translations

to gather together
to get from someone
to accumulate items for a hobby

Extensive Definition

For the telecommunications term, see collect call.
In Christian liturgy, a collect [kɒlɛkt; kol-ekt'] is both a liturgical action and a short, general prayer. In the Middle Ages, the prayer was referred to in Latin as collectio, but in the more ancient sources, as oratio. In English, and in this usage, "collect" is pronounced with the stress on the first syllable. Collects appear in the liturgy of the Mass of the Roman Catholic, Anglican, Lutheran, and some other rites. Beginning with the Lutheran Book of Worship in 1979, contemporary Lutheran liturgies have dropped the name "Collect" in favor of "Prayer of the Day", although the meaning, structure, and function remains the same.

Liturgical collect

Traditionally, the liturgical collect was a dialog between the celebrant and the people. It followed a hymn of praise (such as the "Gloria in Excelsis Deo", if used) after the opening of the service, with a greeting by the celebrant "The Lord be with you", to which the people respond "And also with you" or "And with your spirit." The celebrant then invites all to pray with "Let us pray". In the more ancient practice, an invitation to kneel was given, and the people spend some short time in silent prayer, after which they were invited to stand. Then, the celebrant concluded the time of prayer by "collecting" their prayers in a unified petition of a general form, referred to as a collect. Many of these still in use by churches of the West were originally composed in Latin, wherein they adhere to a flowing chanted style. Traditionally, a collect consisted of a single sentence, although this was often accomplished through non-standard punctuation, with a colon or semi-colon taking the place of a period. In some contemporary liturgical texts, this practice has been discontinued in favor of more standard sentence constructions.
In modern use, the collect is spoken or chanted by the celebrant, and follows the invocation "Let us pray" usually without a (significant) period of silent prayer, and may or may not employ the greeting dialog ("The Lord be with you / And also with you" or "The Lord be with you / And with your spirit").
Typically two or three collects may be used in a traditional Roman Mass.
For the Anglican rite, Thomas Cranmer (d. 1556) translated into English and retained collects for each Sunday of the year in the Book of Common Prayer; they have been part of subsequent alternative liturgies.
Similarly, Lutheran liturgies have typically retained traditional collects for each Sunday of the liturgical year. In the newly released Evangelical Lutheran Worship, however, the set of prayers has been expanded to incorporate different Sunday collects for each year of the lectionary cycle, so that the prayers more closely coordinate with the lectionary scripture readings for the day. In order to achieve this expansion from one year's worth of Sunday collects to three years, modern prayer texts have been added to the existing traditional set.

Form

Collects (the liturgical action and the prayer) have a recognizable form:
  • 1) Invitation ("Oremus" - Let us pray)
  • 2) Address (the person of the Trinity who is being addressed, but usually the Father)
  • 3) An attribute or quality of the deity, which relates to the petition (often "qui ..." - who)
  • 4) The Petition (the matter being asked about or requested)
  • 5) The Reason or Result expected (begins with the word "ut" - that)
  • 6) Christian conclusion ("per Christum Dominum nostrum" - through Christ our Lord), or other longer doxologies
  • 7) General affirmation ("Amen.", untranslated from the Hebrew)

Examples of the prayers

"A Collect for Purity"

:Deus, cui omne cor patet et omnis uoluntas loquitur, et quem nullum latet secretum: purifica per infusionem Sancti Spiritus cogitationes cordis nostri, ut perfecte te diligere et digne laudare mereamur, per Dominum nostrum Iesum Christum. Amen.
''Almighty God, to you all hearts are open, all desires known and from you no secrets are hid: cleanse the thoughts of our hearts by the inspiration of your Holy Spirit, that we may perfectly love you and worthily magnify your holy name, through Jesus Christ our Lord, Amen.''
  • 2) Almighty God,
  • 3) to you all hearts are open, all desires known and from you no secrets are hid:
  • 4) cleanse the thoughts of our hearts by the inspiration of your Holy Spirit,
  • 5) that we may perfectly love you and worthily magnify your holy name,
  • 6) through Jesus Christ our Lord.
  • 7) Amen.

"A Collect for the Renewal of Life"

:''O God, the King eternal, whose light divides the day from the night and turns the shadow of death into the morning: Drive far from us all wrong desires, incline our hearts to keep your law, and guide our feet into the way of peace; that, having done your will with cheerfulness during the day, we may, when night comes, rejoice to give you thanks; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.''
  • 2) O God, the King eternal,
  • 3) whose light divides the day from the night and turns the shadow of death into the morning:
  • 4) Drive far from us all wrong desires, incline our hearts to keep your law, and guide our feet into the way of peace;
  • 5) that, having done your will with cheerfulness during the day, we may, when night comes, rejoice to give you thanks;
  • 6) through Jesus Christ our Lord.
  • 7) Amen.

References

  • Louis Weil. Gathered to Pray: Understanding Liturgical Prayer. Cambridge, MA: Crowley Publications, 1986.
collect in Danish: Kollekt
collect in German: Tagesgebet
collect in Korean: 본기도
collect in Portuguese: Coleta
collect in Russian: Коллекта

Synonyms, Antonyms and Related Words

Angelus, Ave, Ave Maria, Hail Mary, Kyrie Eleison, Paternoster, accouple, accumulate, agglomerate, agglutinate, aggregate, aggroup, aid prayer, align, amass, appeal, array, articulate, assemble, associate, backlog, band, batch, beadroll, beads, beseechment, bidding prayer, bond, bracket, breviary, bridge, bridge over, bring, bring together, bulk, bunch, bunch together, bunch up, cement, chain, chaplet, clap together, clot, clump, cluster, colligate, collocate, combine, come, come together, communion, compare, compile, comprise, concatenate, concentrate, conclude, conglobulate, conglomerate, congregate, congress, conjoin, conjugate, connect, contemplation, control, convene, converge, cool, copulate, corral, couple, cover, crowd, cull, cumulate, date, deduce, deduct, derive, devotions, dig up, dispose, draw, draw a conclusion, draw an inference, draw together, draw up, dredge up, drive together, embrace, encompass, entreaty, extract, fetch, find, flock together, flow together, forgather, fuse, gang around, gang up, garner, garner up, gather, gather around, gather in, gather into barns, gather together, gather up, get, get in, get together, glean, glue, grace, group, grub, grub up, heap up, herd together, hide, hive, hoard, hoard up, hold, horde, huddle, impetration, imploration, include, induce, infer, intercession, invocation, join, judge, juxtapose, keep, knot, lay together, lay up, league, link, litany, lump together, make, make out, make up, marry, marshal, mass, match, meditation, meet, merge, mill, mobilize, muster, obsecration, obtestation, order, orison, pair, partner, petition, pick, pick up, piece together, pile up, pluck, prayer, prayer wheel, put together, put up, raise, rake up, rally, rally around, rank, reason, reason that, rein, rendezvous, repress, restrain, rogation, roll into one, rosary, round up, save, save up, scare up, scrape together, scrape up, secrete, seethe, silent prayer, simmer down, smother, solder, span, splice, squirrel, squirrel away, stick together, stock up, stockpile, store up, stream, suit, summon up, supplication, suppress, surge, swarm, take as proved, take in, take up, tape, thanks, thanksgiving, throng, tie, together, treasure, treasure up, unify, unite, weld, whip in, yoke
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